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Saturday, March 24, 2012

HOW TO GET A RECORD DEAL... INSIDER SECRETS

Here is an industry secret or shortcut that may help you to get a deal. An unsigned band or artist that sells exceptionally well on the SoundScan report can walk into almost any record label in the country with the power to negotiate a very good deal. Impressive SoundScan numbers are like an automatic open door to labels and can actually result in the infamous “bidding war.” This is the surest way to get major label attention and a record deal.

The SoundScan is a report issued weekly that lists what every record in the United States sold last week and the total number of its sales to date. It is the most important report for record label executives because SoundScan results are reviewed and used to make major decisions concerning signed and unsigned bands. If a record’s sales go up on the SoundScan label execs are happy. If a record’s sales go down on the SoundScan the artist may lose their label’s marketing support until the record sales go back up.

There is a serious Catch 22 at work here though. Most labels won’t put much money in to promote a record unless the sales go up. But record sales can’t go up unless the label puts money in to promote the record. This is where independent financing can be crucial. Unfortunately, most signed bands /artists get caught in this situation and end up sitting around with a deal, a release and a dead end record.

Another incredibly important industry secret or shortcut is that a record needs to sell well on the SoundScan in only 1 specific region of the United States in order to get major label attention. Forget about selling your record all over the country, you don’t need to. Conquer one territory. An artist that conquers one territory will most likely be offered a deal,it’s good business.

The SoundScan is divided into several territories: Northwest, Northeast, Midwest, Southwest, Southeast, big cities, rural towns, etc. You can select 1 territory i.e. Florida/Southeast, and focus all your promotion and marketing efforts on that territory to develop high record sales. Label Execs will take notice of any record that is charting and generating large sales in say, Florida/Southeast and will unquestionably want to get in on and capitalize on the action. Bottom Line: If the label sees dollar signs $$$ you can bet you’ll get a deal.

Using this industry secret or shortcut there are only 3 steps you need to take to get a record deal:

Q. Step One -Capital

You’re going into business for yourself so the first thing you need is money or capital. Get an investor or invest your own hard-earned dollars and go professionally record your 2 or 3 best songs. Don’t worry about recording an entire album at this point. Let the record label pay for recording the album later when you get your deal.

With your capital, create a professional promotional package. Press your 2 or 3 songs on a CD with a CD label on the CD and a jacket inlay, album credits photos and/or artwork. Also, create professional marketing materials, including postcards, a poster and assemble a Press Kit which will contain the CD, professional photos, a bio, and gig reviews, if possible. Make 500-1,000 to start. Include your website/webpage address on everything.

Q. Step Two - Promotion

In real estate it’s location, location, location! In the Music Biz it’s Promotion, Promotion, Promotion! Promote and sell that record. MC Hammer sold his records out of his trunk and Metallica sold records at lives shows, both times record execs came sniffing.

Your only goal is to promote your record to radio and the public to get them to buy it and drive your SoundScan numbers through the roof! Quickly look at the word Music Business: Music is one 1/2 of the equation, business is the other. The better you are at business the more successful you will be. Madonna is an incredible business woman and the master of self-promotion, probably the greatest of all time. Self-promotion is crucial to the success of your career.

Here are the 10 ways you can begin to promote your record:

RECORD STORES

1) Visit record stores and give them copies of your record to sell on consignment. If they sell, the store will ask for more. These sold records will be reported to SoundScan. Contact CD Baby, CD Now or Amazon.com for information about selling your CD on their sites.

2) Do in-store performances at record stores for free, see if they’ll hang your poster.

PERFORM LIVE

3) Play every Club and Festival you can throughout your target market. Plaster your poster around town to promote these gigs. Collect a mailing list, physical & E-mail addresses at your gigs. Send out postcards and E-mails to keep your fans updated on your upcoming shows.

4) Sell CDs at your own shows. Make sure you get a SoundScan sheet and record all sales and report it to SoundScan. Those sales count!

WEBPAGE

5) Create a professional Web page containing your bio, photos, press coverage, the dates of your upcoming shows and most importantly samples or MP3’s of your music. Whenever talking about your band refer all contacts to your webpage, especially booking agents, managers, radio people, promoters and reporters.

RADIO

6) Hire an independent record promoter and/or visit every appropriate radio station and convince DJ’s and Program or Music Director’s to play your CD. Give them your Press Kit. Do in-store performances at radio stations for free.

TV

7) Perform live for local television wherever possible. Get exposure!

8) Contact the Music Director of every show on that station and offer your music for free for use on any of their programs.

PIGGYBACK

9) Contact managers and local promoters and open for name bands or local bands performing in your target market. Becoming the opening act for another local band lets their record company pay for all the promotion, radio spots, flyers, posters, etc. that advertise your band on the bill.

THE PRESS

10)Contact all local newspapers and magazines and invite the press to review your CD and/or attend your shows for free. Arrange as many magazine and newspaper interviews as you can. If you can afford to, hire a publicist!

That’s it. It’s simple. Once your CD is recorded and your press kit is in hand, all you need to do now is to focus on promoting your record. Your goal is to generate as many units sold as possible. This whole process could take 1-3 years so be patient and don’t give up. Overnight successes are possible, but rare. If you are serious about a getting a record deal you need to prove to the label that you are an investment and a risk worth taking. Solid SoundScan numbers speak loud and clear.

Q. Step Three - Call Labels

Contact labels and tell them about your SoundScan results. Tell them how many CDs you've sold online on your FB page or Cd Baby or any number of online retailers. If you are selling over 15,000 CD's go ahead and arrange meetings with all interested labels. Congratulations!

So that’s all there is to it! Now you know a few industry secrets and shortcuts. You are armed with information that may make all the difference between you having a successful start in the music industry or being just another wannabee recording star.

Follow these shortcuts and you will have record execs opening their doors to you and serving you a deal on a silver platter.

If you are serious about getting a deal you have to be willing to work hard for it, but these secret shortcuts can make it a lot less painful!

GOOD LUCK!

If you liked this information and found it helpful leave a comment! I love to hear from new people.

Subscribe to my Secrets Of A Hollywood Talent Manager TV You Tube Channel with over 200 FREE Videos! And follow me on Twitter @WAW_wendy 


Wendy Alane Wright Smith
Talent Manager
WAW ENTERTAINMENT
wawentertainment@yahoo.com

The Real Differences Between A Talent Agent and a Talent Manager (This post has 64,660 views)

Wendy Alane Wright with Cynthia Barry Talent Agent at First Class Talent, Philip Marcus Talent Agent at Clear Talent, Robin Nassif Taent Agent at Media Artist Group, Jackie Lewis Talent Agent at LB Talent, and Talent Managers from Pink Hammer Management and Elileen O'Farrell Management


Wendy Alane Wright is a Hollywood talent manager and the President of WAW Entertainment. Her clients have appeared on television networks such as ABC, NBC, TNT, CBS, Comedy Central, BIO, Lifetime, and more. They have booked TV shows including “Modern Family,” “Blackish,” “Extant,” “The Colony,” “Animal Kingdom,” “My Haunted House,” and “Henry Danger,” "American Horror Story," as well as hundreds of commercials for major spots including Shutterfly, Mercedes, Visa, Taco Bell, Honda, Legos, Hot Wheels, and many more. Prior to being a Manager and a Talent Agent at Burn Down Entertainment, Wright assisted many high profile managers, agents, and publicists. For 20 years she was a recording artist, actor, and music producer, and is now the author of five books in a series called, “Secrets of a Hollywood Talent Manager.” Wright teaches the business of acting all over the country and is on the faculty of schools including the New York Studio for Stage and Screen in North Carolina and LA Acting Academy in Phoenix, Arizona. For years she has appeared in numerous magazines, and on radio shows and talk shows including “The Oprah Winfrey Show.”

What is the difference between a Talent Manager and a Talent Agent?

Acting can sometimes be a confusing profession to those just starting out. There are so many unwritten rules. However, going into an acting career armed with knowledge will help minimize the confusion and maximize the success. Many beginning actors mistakenly think that “talent agent” and “talent manager” are two names for the same job. Actually, they are very different, but in a similar way. The best way to explain the differences is to tackle the job responsibilities separately, giving actors a good idea of those differences.

TALENT AGENT

A talent agent works for a talent agency where they use their contacts to arrange auditions for the actors represented by the agency. They are a very important piece of the puzzle to your career.
A talent agent is able to provide an actor with auditions they would not otherwise know about. Without the appropriate industry auditions, an actor’s career will go nowhere. When securing a talent agent, actors should seek talent agencies franchised with The Screen Actors Guild (SAG). This means the agency and its agents have signed a contract agreeing to follow the rules regulated by the actors union.

An actor should NEVER pay a talent agent or agency up front for auditions or representation. A legitimate talent agent ONLY gets paid when their client books a job from an audition the agent has arranged. Agents typically receive a 10% commission, sometime 15%. For commercials they typically receive 20%. Legit talent agencies do not charges fees for representation EVER.

WHAT DO AGENTS DO?
Agents spend most of the day on the phones, looking through the “breakdowns” (a daily listing of all the acting roles the studios/casting directors are seeking) and submitting pictures to casting directors, hoping to get you in on an audition. If an agent works hard for you, they may be able to get frequent auditions for you. This is a good thing because the more acting auditions you go on, the better chance you’ll have of getting a part. Agents also negotiate contracts and how much money you get if you do get an acting role. However, most of the days are spent trying to get you the audition.

HOW DO AGENTS GET ACTORS AUDITIONS?
There are many other factors that can determine you getting the role. Do you fit the part? Having a great DEMO REEL is critical along with a great headshot and a good resume. In any occupation you must have some experience in order to get a job and the entertainment business is no different. Having an agent on a “higher level” can open some doors smaller agencies might not be able to. But you will have to work your way up to the higher-level agents. In fact, 99% of new actors are not even considered by these “A” Level agencies because they mostly handle the big stars (CAA, William Morris Endeavor) It is very well possible that one of these agents will approach you one day. I say, “approach you” because the majority of the time these agents cannot be acquired. They seek you out when you reach a certain level in your career. Of course, you’d have to be out there in film or television doing something notable in order for these agents to approach you. Most actors seek representation from agents on the B and C levels. But quite honestly you can build amazing careers with some of the lower level agencies. I personally have friends at many of these agencies too and they are outstanding agents. The bigger agencies have a huge packaging system that package projects their lower level actors and with their stars to give the newer actors bigger opportunities. That's the benefit of the bigger agencies and the clout that comes with it can open almost any door and the relationships they have with producers and directors and writers are profound since they represent most of them.

Here is what the former head of a major studio and now Talent Manager has to say about "A" level agents vs "B or C" level agents: "When actors are young they are intrigued by the big building and their egos get stroked by potentially being sought after by a top 5 agency. But my job is to let them understand they they will get lost at the big agencies and that at this level in their early career, it does not serve them. If you have a young movie star on your hands, who has reason to believe that they could be the next Halle Barry or Ryan Reynolds, then when the time is right, you walk them into an APA or CAA or Paradigm just like Talent Agents Cindy Osbrink or Judy Savage has done and you become the mother agent. But if they are just going to be a hard working actor on a series and don't envision needing to be packaged, then you are good with a lower level agency."

Agencies play a numbers game and money is the sole objective. The more clients they have the more opportunities clients have to book and make the agency money. Therefore some talent agencies will have 500 to thousands of clients. Agents drop clients if they are not booking work. Every year during 'drop season', agents evaluate their roster and release the actors who are not getting jobs, network tests, producer's sessions and callbacks. Agents are not in the artist development business. They often do not take newcomers unless they are children. They prefer to have actors who already have credits and can prove their marketability. In today's market, actors often build up their own resumes through self-submissions,  or help from a talent manager until they are ready for the attention of an agent.  Today's actors must be very social media savvy and those with large Instagram, or YouTube followers can prove to be a huge draw for agents. 

CAN ACTORS HAVE MORE THAN ONE AGENT?
Actors often have several agents working for them on their behalf. 
1) Talent Agent for Film and Television 
2) Commercials Agent for Commercials and Print work  
3) Voice Over agent 

Actors can have agents in different markets. For example they can have local Agents in their home state covering that region of the country and have agents in the larger markets.  If your hometown agent gets you a job, your agent (s) in the larger markets do not take commission and vise versa.


TALENT MANAGER

Legally managers are not allowed to procure employment for actors unless they have a Talent Agent License. Managers can not negotiate contracts on behalf of talent. For most performers, the reason they want a manager is because they think the manager will find them work in the industry. But in California, it’s actually illegal for anyone other than a licensed talent agent to procure of offer employment to actors, or others rendering professional services in motion picture, theatrical, radio, television and other entertainment enterprises. California Labor Code §1700.4. If a Talent manager is working in conjunction with a Talent Agent,  managers are legally allowed to be a part of the negotiations.

SO WHAT DOES A TALENT MANAGER DO?
The following are some things that many talent managers may also do:

* Prepare talent for meetings with potential talent agencies.
* Arrange introductions to agents.
* Help talent decide on a talent agency for representation.
* Advise talent on acting classes and coaching.
* Help talent choose a good photographer and pick out headshots.
* Promote talent to industry professionals to try to help talent get auditions.
* Prepare resume or advise talent on preparation of a resume.
* Help make any and all decisions related to talent’s career.
* Answer questions on anything related to a career in show business.

Talent managers make sure that actors are accurately listed on IMDB, Actors Access, LA Casting and that an actor’s membership is current with SAG-AFTRA, and other collective guilds or unions; Managers determine an actor’s most marketable type and the kinds of projects on which an actor is most likely to find work; Managers will advise actors on their image, resume format and content, headshots, acting classes, demo reels, websites, personal appearance and overall career direction.

A talent manager also handles public relations, business matters, and helps to make a career plan and keeps the actor on a path toward success. An an actor's fame and career grows, most actors cannot juggle the acting demands, interviews, and appearances that come with a prominent career. That is where a talent manager comes in. They coordinate the actors schedule and speak on behalf of the actor.

Some talent managers are very hands on and give very specific instructions on every little step that you make in the entertainment industry, including exactly what acting teacher and coaches to use, workshops to attend, what photographer to use, where to get your haircut, and so on. Others have much more flexibility and only give you suggestions for these things. Managers are more or less the quarterback of the team (actor, manager, agents), setting a direction, telling the actor what they need to do to compete -- and giving them the bad news in terms of what they cannot do.

Managers take more of an interest in promoting, cultivating and marketing their actors. Managers will help actors understand contracts, compensation, billing practices, safety, and speak on your behalf when necessary. Personal mangers act as liaison between their clients and theatrical agents, other professionals in the entertainment industry, and the general public. When you have problems on the set or in a job an actor should always contact their manager, not their agent. It the managers duty to coddle, mold, advise and generally speaking, smother their clients with individual care, attention and at times emotional support. Managers have been known to deliver your favorite sandwich to the set if it makes you feel better.

The manager’s job is to guide and advise your career. If you haven’t been able to get an agent yet, the manager will guide you and help you become as marketable and attractive to talent buyers and agents as possible. When the manager feels you are ready to meet with agents, they may help you get an agent. Further, they help manage the artist's personal and professional life in a way that allows the artist to focus on creative productivity.

A manager is the artist's representative, and acts as liaison between their clients and both the public and theatrical agent, publicists, label, studio, publisher, talent agency, touring personnel, attorneys, business managers, and other professionals and anyone else associated with the artist's business. A manager works closely with the artist's publicists and stylists to create and maintain the artist's image. Depending on how hectic the artist/business schedule is, we also manage aspects of the artist's/business owner’s personal life such as hiring household staff, finding contractors, hiring doctors, nurses, personal assistants.

From simple suggestions, to complex negotiations, to long term career plans, a manager lives the artist's career every day behind the scenes. The manager's commitment to and involvement in the artist's career is one hundred percent. The personal manager is the driving force breaking through the barriers of frustration and difficulty so often encountered in the entertainment industry.

Personal managers have the expertise to find and develop new talent and create opportunities and develop marketing strategies for those artists which they represent.

WHY DOES AN ACTOR NEED A TALENT MANAGER?
Talent managers invest a great deal of time and energy into an actor’s potential, and into a long-term career for their clients, long before the actor has a track record of booking consistently. They typically work with their clients over a period of a number of years, sometimes for the entire duration of an actor's career. They tend to genuinely care about their clients, almost like a family, and protect their clients from the harmful situations that may be encountered in the dog-eat-dog world of show business. A personal manager is the one who believes in and keeps fighting for a client when all others have given up.

Agents in larger markets have very little time for direct interaction with actors and often prefer to work in conjunction with a manager. The manager deals directly with the actor, or the parents if the actor is a minor, and is a spokesperson on behalf of the client. Some actors only have a manager, some actors only have a talent agent. Actors who are working in Los Angeles typically have both if they are lucky and talented enough to get them. Managers tend to have a small limited roster of 50 - 100 clients which allows them to give clients much more personal attention. (Some of the larger management companies may have 500 clients.)

In the past, a talent manager’s focus has always been on managing an actor’s career rather than with arranging auditions. Talent managers keep in close touch with talent agents to ensure a shared vision for the actor, but a manager stays mostly on the management end of the actor’s career. Sometimes a talent manager may set up an audition for an actor, but that is not their focus unless that is part of the services they have agreed to provide to you. A talent manager will not guarantee auditions for an actor and does not have to. Securing auditions is the primarily the talent agent’s job.

Outside of the big entertainment industry cities like Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Atlanta most actors across the country in the smaller markets only have talent agents. In smaller markets there are Mother Agencies that discover, develop and take talent to industry showcases where their clients can meet agents and managers from the bigger markets.

WHAT DO TALENT MANAGERS GET PAID?
Just as with talent agents, an actor should never pay a talent manager up front or for representation. Because of the extensive amount of work talent managers do they take a higher percentage of an actor’s earnings than a talent agent does. Most managers earn 20% of every dollar an actor makes from ANY work they do in the entertainment industry across the board, that includes work the actor gets on their own and work the actor's agent gets them.

The differences between a talent agent and a talent manager vary, but their responsibilities are geared toward the same goal… advancing an actor’s career and getting the actor more acting jobs so the actors makes more money. A good manager will help shape the direction an actor goes so as to generate the most revenue. The bottom line is that when an actor succeeds and gets paid, everybody gets paid. Both talent agents and talent managers will work hard to make that happen.

The Bottom Line for Actors: Both talent agents and talent manager can be very important to the success of your career in entertainment. An important step to building a healthy and successful career is to understand the difference between the two.

WATCH THIS VIDEO: The Difference Between An Agent and Manager 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2HpkRp4lHQ

And READ this wonderful article in Backstage written by my friend Matt Newton: http://www.backstage.com/advice-for-actors/backstage-experts/agents-vs-managers-which-one-right-you/?utm_campaign=Expert%20Posts&utm_content=10613332&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook


ALL NEW ACTORS SHOULD READ THESE BOOKS for step-by step instructions to get working in show business. They will be of great help to you. To buy click HERE

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5MBYUZJRTCS6Ahttps://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ZZQDDEENHD97U

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CREDIT DUE: Above article is compiled from personal experience, and various websites including National Conference of Personal Managers (NCOPM) and Talent Managers Association (TMA).

Visit my website to get 3 FREE chapters of my e-book "How To Break Into Show Business; Secrets Of A Hollywood Talent Manager" and get on the mailing list for information about upcoming workshops, discounted classes and show biz resources. 

If you liked this information and found it helpful leave a comment! I love to hear from new people.

Subscribe to my Secrets Of A Hollywood Talent Manager TV You Tube Channel with over 300+FREE Videos! And follow me on Twitter @WAW_wendy 


See you on the Red Carpet!

Wendy Alane Wright Smith
Talent Manager
WAW ENTERTAINMENT
wawentertainment@yahoo.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012

How To Become An Actor - Secrets Of A Talent Manager (This post has 9,286 views)

Wendy Alane Wright with Cynthia Barry Talent Agent at First Class Talent, Philip Marcus Talent Agent at Clear Talent, Robin Nassif Taent Agent at Media Artist Group, Jackie Lewis Talent Agent at LB Talent, and Talent Managers from Pink Hammer Management and Elileen O'Farrell Management

      Wendy Alane Wright

Wendy Alane Wright is a Hollywood talent manager and the president of WAW Entertainment. Her clients have appeared on television networks such as ABC, NBC, TNT, CBS, Comedy Central, BIO, Lifetime, and more. They have booked TV shows including “Modern Family,” “Blackish,” “Extant,” “The Colony,” “Animal Kingdom,” “My Haunted House,” and “Henry Danger,” as well as hundreds of commercials for major spots including Shutterfly, Mercedes, Visa, Taco Bell, Honda, Legos, Hot Wheels, and many more. 
Prior to being a manager and a talent agent at Burn Down Entertainment, Wright assisted many high profile managers, agents, and publicists. For 20 years she was a recording artist, actor, and music producer, and is now the author of five books called, “Secrets of a Hollywood Talent Manager.” Wright teaches the business of acting all over the country and is on the faculty of schools including the New York Studio for Stage and Screen in North Carolina and LA Acting Academy in Phoenix, Arizona. For years she has appeared in numerous magazines, and on radio shows and talk shows including “The Oprah Winfrey Show.”


For NEW actors coming to Los Angeles ! Welcome:)

My name is Wendy Alane Wright and I am a Talent Manager at WAW Entertaiment in Los Angeles California. Coming to LA to work as an actor may seem daunting. You have big dreams and have no idea where to start. Where should you study? What do you do first? Who do you trust?

Me:) You have found a friend here in LA. A friend who knows this business inside and out. I have spent 20+ years in this business. I started as an Assistant at APA a huge Talent Agency that reps major stars, then became a Talent Agent and now I am a Talent Manager.

Finding a reputable manager who believes in you, and is interested in developing you into a talent that makes Agents take notice is a great way to start  building your team.  You can visit Samuel French Bookstore online at www.SamuelFrench.com or in person at 7623 Sunset Boulevard and pick up the book “The Right Manager.” This books lists what type of clients managers are interested in working with, and who is taking on new clients.  Some managers take new people with potential. Other managers want actors who are further along and have already gotten themselves a bunch of acting work through the methods I desribe below.

You can write potential managers a brief letter with a great happy picture of you and ask if they would be interested in meeting with you. Make sure you give a them a little detail about your acting background, current training and acting jobs you have booked. If you have an acting resume and demo send it with.

If you don't have an Actor's resume look at the example on Actors Pages. When you are starting out, you might not have any film or TV credits. That is expected, you are new. Therefore your Theater performances and acting training will therefore be very, very important. For kids we are often looking for a look, a personality, a type we don't have on our roster already. Managers take new kids on but they must be able to speak, make eye contact, show energy, expression and emotion. 
If they do this naturally that's fine. If they learned it in theater and acting classes that's great too. However they came to have those abilities is irrelevant. The fact is those skills are MANDATORY.

My company WAW ENTERTAINMENT talent management in Los Angeles is always looking for talented & beautiful kids ages 6-14 for Film, TV, Webseries and Commercials. If you live in Los Angeles or plan to be here for 2-3 months between Feb-July or Sept-Nov. submit headshots and Resumes to wawentertainment@yahoo.com

Please include: Photos of your child, age, height, weight, city and state you live in and a 30 second video of your child talking about something important to them. Sports, friends, school, food, movies etc. You can record the video on your iPhone, upload it to You Tube, mark video as unlisted and include the link in your email to us. If we are interested we will contact you. We want to get an idea of their personality. We look forward to reviewing your submissions.

Here is a resume of a 16 year old in Kentucky. She is serious about becoming an actor and her resume PROVES it. Look at the training she has had and the theater she has done. How does yours compare?  Click on this link to see Alicen's resume. This is what you need to start building your resume into.

VERY, VERY, VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure if you are 1, 2 or 3 years away from moving to LA that you are doing as MUCH community, regional or professional theatre as you possibly can to build your skill, experience and resume. Also, find a good acting teacher or acting class where you live. Take classes in all four of the following:
  1. Scene Work
  2. On Camera
  3. Improvisation
  4. Cold Reading ...wherever it is offered.

When you sign with a manager you should NEVER pay upfront money. Managers make 15% commission ONLY when you work. They will guide you and help you find classes to strengthen your Audition Skills, Cold Reading Skills and Scene Study Skills. They will give you the names of several reputable photographers to create your headshots and so much more. Read my BLOG: "The Difference Between Agents and Managers" for helpful information.

IMPORTANT: You don’t have to wait until you have a manager to get started. There is plenty for you to do! In fact, even when you have a manager or an agent you can’t leave it all up to them, you will still have to work hard on behalf of yourself and your own career everyday.

HEADSHOTS
So it’s time to get your Headshots. Don’t be cheap on these pictures. They are your calling card and the most important 1st investment of your career. When you shoot your headshots, you will need 2 different headshots; 1 commercial picture, which usually has a great big smile and lots of energy, and 1 dramatic picture. I always suggest MichaelHelms.com Stephanie Girard, Linda Vanoff, and Mark Cartright. They are great photographers and competitively priced at $250-$450 for 3-4 looks. During your photo session, make sure you try different emotions so you can get different looks; angry, happy, serious. Be thinking about something when you are shooting. Acting is the eyes and the camera will pick up a blank look. So have real emotion. Plus, doing this will give you more pics to chose from later. Remember your pics should look exactly like you. When you get a manager or agent show them the pictures from this 1st session, they may be able to use them, or they may have you shoot again with a photographer they recommend. This is quite common. You will change your pictures often and every time you change your look. Note: If you are not getting called in on auditions, it may be that your headshot is not working. Try a different picture until you find one that works.

Your photographer may help you choose 2 pics and retouch them digitally for you. Then you should make 25-50 8x10 reproductions. You can do this at Ray's Photo Lab online. Simply upload your high resolution image and follow the site's directions.

REPUTABLE ONLINE CASTING WEBSITES
Your next step is to join several online casting websites including Actors Access, La Casting, backstage.com and Now Casting. These sites contain breakdowns of all kind of jobs that you can submit your picture and resume for. If you are selected you will be called into audition for the role. A breakdown is a description of the project and characters. Sides are the pages of script you will be required to read from.

On all of your Online Casting Websites, upload at least 5 different pictures with different looks and expressions, complete the resume section, and pay for unlimited submissions on each site. You should submit yourself EVERYDAY to non-union feature films, pilots, TV shows, student films, commercials, webisodes and more. When you audition for these projects give it 100% and hope you book it, but don’t dwell on it. This is a numbers game and you may have to audition 100 times to book 1 project. The better your audition skills, the better those odds get. That is why it is so important to take audition classes when you get here. I recommend Doug Warhit,  MelissaSkoff.com She is a Casting Director who has cast 100+ Features & TV Shows and thousands of actors. She is great, you will learn a lot, and I recommend her to all of my signed clients. For Scene Study classes Bobbie Chance offers a great class for only $25. There are tons of great classes, but to see the ones I recommend read one of my other blogs about Los Angeles Acting Classes.

Often when you start auditioning for acting jobs, the ones you book will be non-paying, but that is okay. You are a beginner. Each time you work you will gain experience and a credit for your resume. You may also get the footage of your work to use on your Demo Reel. It usually takes awhile to get any of the footage so be patient, yet at the same time be persistent and polite while you try to get it. Expect to train and work on projects that you self submit for for the first 2 years.

Once you have strong audition skills, some acting experience and credits on your resume, along with numerous training credits your next step is to start building relationships with Managers, Agents and Casting Directors. (Don't do this until you are ready)

Casting Directors are THE people that bring you to the people can hire you. They are incredibly important people that need to know you and what you can do. I think the best way to meet them is by attending various Casting Director Workshops. They are usually 1-2 hours and Casting Directors take time to read you, watch you and even give you feedback. Places like Act Now! Actors West, Actors LinkReal Pros and One on One offer regular Casting Director Workshops.

Don’t bother mass mailing your photos and headshots to Casting Directors. They don’t respond and you waste your time and money. In the beginning of your career a Casting Director may call you in to audition because you have the look they may be looking for. Usually you will most likely to be considered for smaller roles because you have less experience. These roles are called 5 and Under meaning you may have only 5 lines or under. These are great for your resume and give you valuable experience. Most agents won’t even consider you until you have had some of these. So start trying to get small roles in lesser know TV known shows, roles in indie films, and work as much as you can so you can develop your talent, gain experience and become more interesting to Agent and managers.

If you are coming here with big dreams and you feel that you are very talented, you are going to have to prove that to everyone. No one know will know what you are capable of, even you haven’t seen all you can do. Booking these beginning jobs will help you become more confident and more aware of your own abilities. Don't think you are going to move out to LA and get on a TV show right away. That almost NEVER happens. Doing that is like catching lightning in a bottle and is about the same odds as winning the lottery. Instead, be prepared to make contacts, work hard, study continuously and work every chance you can get.

Once you are able to prove yourself to Agents with a great resume and a Demo Reel that shows your ability, you will absolutely need an Agent to take you to the next level. Agents will submit you on the big stuff and if you do everything I have mentioned for the first 2 or 3 years when you are here, you may just be ready to grab the attention of an Agent. There is a lot of competition for an agent so you have to be prepared, have strong skills, and be persistent. There are more actors than available agents. Do live theatre, get in a show and invite agents to see you. A great way to have agents become familiar with your work is to participate in Showcases in front of agents. To participate in a showcase check out HollywoodActingworkshop.com or ActorsWest.com

Miscellaneous items you need are a passport and a Thomas Guide. The Thomas Guide contains maps of LA and surrounding areas. If your phone or car has GPS this will also help you. If you are looking for a safe, convenient place to live, I suggest Studio City or North Hollywood. They have easy access to major freeways, it's filled with industry people and other actors. Academy Pointe Apartments at 6340 Lankershim Boulevard, North Hollywood is a great place to start.

You must always be going for this career 100% - be over prepared for auditions, familiarize yourself with the sides and script when available, know the TV shows you are auditioning for and the tone of them. Definitely carry a box of headshots and resumes- stapled- in your trunk and bring them to every audition. Have several outfits in your care, sporty, business, etc. Do not show up unprepared. It will make you look bad and your manager or agent look bad. People want to work with professionals, so be professional. Be early to every meeting or audition, be polite and have an attitude of Gratitude. No one owes you anything. There is always another actor available who is better than you, so work hard to become your best and be respectful. Leave the negative part of your ego wherever it is you are moving from.

You will need to create a website with your Headshots, Resumes and Contact Info to make it easy for industry people to find out about you. You can build one through Go Daddy. There are also many other companies out there. Your website address should just be your name. Nothing fancy like "Joe the greatest actor in the world." Here is an example of a professional working Actor's website www.MorganObenreder.com

You will need to change your phone number when you come out here to a local number either 818, 310, 323 so Casting Directors, Managers etc.will know you are here to stay.

You will need to have, or begin creating a DEMO Reel. If you don't have one you can use the footage of the projects you book to start to build your resume and your Reel. You can also hire a production company to shoot a scene or monologue for you. It will look professional and help you get auditions. I recommend Group 8 Productions (818) 808-0022. Having a Demo Reel is crucial and will make it so much easier to sell yourself to Casting Directors and Agents. Once your Reel is complete you will need to upload it to all of your Online Casting Websites. Once you have your Demo Reel, create a YOU TUBE Channel and upload your Demo Reel to it. You can send the link to interested Casting Directors and Managers. Note: A Demo Reel should never be longer than 2-3 minutes. If you have multiple scenes upload each one individually.

Get some Business Cards with your photo on them, website address, the links to your La Casting and Actors Access profiles and a local phone number. Always be prepared to make new contacts and keep track of them in a computer database program like ACT or a simple notebook. You will want to follow up with everyone you meet regularly and professionally. "Reasonable Contact" is appropriate and is exemplified by sending a Post Card thanking Casting Directors for an audition, announcing an acting job you booked, a callback you got, a show you are appearing in, or "Happy Holidays" Card at Christmas. Keep in touch with people every month. You can order business cards online for only $25 at VistaPrint.com

Constant marketing, Headshots, Reels and Auditioning Skills are the basis for how you begin your Acting Career. The Acting business is a process. Working in this industry takes time, a plan and luck. 50,000 new actors come to LA every year and within 3 years 90% leave. So if you want to be part of the 10% that stays and actually works, you have got to see this as a business that you run and are always building. Rarely are there overnight successes. Your team, which includes YOU, your Manager and Agent, will work for you and help you grow your business. 25% of your career will be acting 75% of it will be promoting yourself and doing business. I hope this gives you something to think about.

Don't come out here broke if you can help it. Save as much money as you can between now and when you come out. $10,000 is what it takes every year to pay for this acting career. Be ready to work hard when you get here. Only hard workers succeed in this business.

Make friends with the other actors you meet in acting classes. They are a great support, may have been here longer than you, and often have a wealth of information and experience. But choose the positive people. Every actor has a different experience here and you don't need anyone else's negativity. Surround yourself with other hard working actors who are focused and working. You can learn a lot from them.

If you are going to some out to LA to "make it" and work as an actor I give you this solid piece of advice: Don't come if you can be happy doing anything else. This is a very difficult business, full of rejection, competition and disappointment. You ONLY want to come here if Acting is the ONLY way you can be happy. And then, your goal should not be to come here so you can "become famous" instead, it should be to become the best actor you can be and do work you are in love with.

I offer a workshop called, “The Winner's Circle" for brand new actors which will help you begin to understand the business and start to develop a plan of action for your success. I teach it along with several important industry friends of mine a theatrical Agent, Commercial Agent, Casting Director, Headshot Photographer, Working Actor and Reel Producer. You will learn so much information in this workshop from top people in the business  who are all committed to your success! I have been coaching actors for years so if you are new to this business I highly recommend this workshop. It will give you the "inside" information you need and it will put you miles ahead of the hundreds of other newcomers that arrive in L.A. every year. At the end of this 4-hour seminar with us you will have a game plan for success. The cost is $179 and it's worth every penny. Visit my website and sign up today for the next workshop. (818) 203-6080

People ask what kind of actors do I look for?

They have to be talented and have a huge drive to succeed in this industry. They have to be focused and willing to give everything they have to the process; the preparation, the auditions, the classes, the characters they play, and the jobs they get. They have to be ready for 95 no's to every 1 yes. They need to be well-trained and always training. They have to have time and resources to aggressively pursue their career. And they have to be open to taking my direction.

I have to feel that any actor I work with would be a responsible person for me to invest my time, energy, expertise and resources in. I only get paid when they do. Therefore, I want people who are going to work hard at what they do, as hard as I work to get them the opportunities. When I take on a developmental client, which means they have no TV credits, have only done student films, don't know casting directors, don't have an agent, I know it will likely take years to build them into a profitable business. If I take that risk with someone, it is because I believe in them, their talent and their ability to really succeed in this business. I truly enjoy the creative process of developing an actor's career. I am as happy as they are when they get a job. Not because of the money (although that can be great) rather because of the actors chance to be creative and express themselves as artists. I live for giving these amazing people that I work with that opportunity.


Make sure to regularly check out my other blogs at “How to Break Into Show Business: Secrets of a Talent Manager” where I discuss in more detail each of the subjects I have covered above. 


IF YOU WANT TO BE ON TV AND IN FILMS 
YOU MUST GET THESE e-BOOKS HERE.  
Buy 1 get the other e-Book FREE! (For a limited time)

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5MBYUZJRTCS6A      https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ZZQDDEENHD97U


A few times a year I offer a workshop called, “The Winner's Circle" for brand new actors which will help you begin to understand the business and start to develop a plan of action for your success. I teach it along with several important industry friends of mine including a top Theatrical Agent, Commercial Agent, Casting Director, Headshot Photographer, Working Actor and including Reel Producer. You will learn so much information in this workshop from top people in the business who are all committed to your success! I have been coaching actors for years, and I know new actors need a mentor and professional guidance, so if you are new to this business I highly recommend this workshop. It will give you the "inside" information you need and it will put you miles ahead of the hundreds of other newcomers that arrive in L.A. every year. At the end of this 4-hour seminar with us you will have a game plan for success. The cost is $179 and it's worth every penny. Visit my website and sign up today for the next workshop. Check website for next date and for more info.



I wish you great success! Break a Leg!

If you liked this information and found it helpful leave a comment! I love to hear from new people.

Subscribe to my Secrets Of A Hollywood Talent Manager TV You Tube Channel with over 200 FREE Videos! And follow me on Twitter @WAW_wendy


Wendy Alane Wright Smith
The Hollywood Talent Manager
WAW ENTERTAINMENT
wawentertainment@yahoo.com

How To Become An Actor - Secrets Of A Talent Manager (This post has 11,590 views)

Wendy Alane Wright with Cynthia Barry Talent Agent at First Class Talent, Philip Marcus Talent Agent at Clear Talent, Robin Nassif Taent Agent at Media Artist Group, Jackie Lewis Talent Agent at LB Talent, and Talent Managers from Pink Hammer Management and Elileen O'Farrell Management

Wendy Alane Wright is a Hollywood talent manager and the president of WAW Entertainment. Her clients have appeared on television networks such as ABC, NBC, TNT, CBS, Comedy Central, BIO, Lifetime, and more. They have booked TV shows including “Modern Family,” “Blackish,” “Extant,” “The Colony,” “Animal Kingdom,” “My Haunted House,” and “Henry Danger,” as well as hundreds of commercials for major spots including Shutterfly, Mercedes, Visa, Taco Bell, Honda, Legos, Hot Wheels, and many more. Prior to being a manager and a talent agent at Burn Down Entertainment, Wright assisted many high profile managers, agents, and publicists. For 20 years she was a recording artist, actor, and music producer, and is now the author of five books called, “Secrets of a Hollywood Talent Manager.” Wright teaches the business of acting all over the country and is on the faculty of schools including the New York Studio for Stage and Screen in North Carolina and LA Acting Academy in Phoenix, Arizona. For years she has appeared in numerous magazines, and on radio shows and talk shows including “The Oprah Winfrey Show.”


For NEW actors coming to Los Angeles ! Welcome:)

My name is Wendy Alane Wright and I am a Talent Manager at WAW Entertaiment in Los Angeles California. Coming to LA to work as an actor may seem daunting. You have big dreams and have no idea where to start. Where should you study? What do you do first? Who do you trust?

Me:) You have found a friend here in LA. A friend who knows this business inside and out. I have spent 20+ years in this business. I started as an Assistant at APA a huge Talent Agency that reps major stars, then became a Talent Agent and now I am a Talent Manager.

Finding a reputable manager who believes in you, and is interested in developing you into a talent that makes Agents take notice is a great way to start  building your team.  You can visit Samuel French Bookstore online at www.SamuelFrench.com or in person at 7623 Sunset Boulevard and pick up the book “The Right Manager.” This books lists what type of clients managers are interested in working with, and who is taking on new clients.  Some managers take new people with potential. Other managers want actors who are further along and have already gotten themselves a bunch of acting work through the methods I desribe below.

You can write potential managers a brief letter with a great happy picture of you and ask if they would be interested in meeting with you. Make sure you give a them a little detail about your acting background, current training and acting jobs you have booked. If you have an acting resume and demo send it with.

If you don't have an Actor's resume look at the example on Actors Pages. When you are starting out, you might not have any film or TV credits. That is expected, you are new. Therefore your Theater performances and acting training will therefore be very, very important. For kids we are often looking for a look, a personality, a type we don't have on our roster already. Managers take new kids on but they must be able to speak, make eye contact, show energy, expression and emotion. 
If they do this naturally that's fine. If they learned it in theater and acting classes that's great too. However they came to have those abilities is irrelevant. The fact is those skills are MANDATORY.

My company WAW ENTERTAINMENT talent management in Los Angeles is always looking for talented & beautiful kids ages 6-14 for Film, TV, Webseries and Commercials. If you live in Los Angeles or plan to be here for 2-3 months between Feb-July or Sept-Nov. submit headshots and Resumes to wawentertainment@yahoo.com

Please include: Photos of your child, age, height, weight, city and state you live in and a 30 second video of your child talking about something important to them. Sports, friends, school, food, movies etc. You can record the video on your iPhone, upload it to You Tube, mark video as unlisted and include the link in your email to us. If we are interested we will contact you. We want to get an idea of their personality. We look forward to reviewing your submissions.

Here is a resume of a 16 year old in Kentucky. She is serious about becoming an actor and her resume PROVES it. Look at the training she has had and the theater she has done. How does yours compare?  Click on this link to see Alicen's resume. This is what you need to start building your resume into.

VERY, VERY, VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure if you are 1, 2 or 3 years away from moving to LA that you are doing as MUCH community, regional or professional theatre as you possibly can to build your skill, experience and resume. Also, find a good acting teacher or acting class where you live. Take classes in all four of the following:
  1. Scene Work
  2. On Camera
  3. Improvisation
  4. Cold Reading ...wherever it is offered.

When you sign with a manager you should NEVER pay upfront money. Managers make 15% commission ONLY when you work. They will guide you and help you find classes to strengthen your Audition Skills, Cold Reading Skills and Scene Study Skills. They will give you the names of several reputable photographers to create your headshots and so much more. Read my BLOG: "The Difference Between Agents and Managers" for helpful information.

IMPORTANT: You don’t have to wait until you have a manager to get started. There is plenty for you to do! In fact, even when you have a manager or an agent you can’t leave it all up to them, you will still have to work hard on behalf of yourself and your own career everyday.

HEADSHOTS
So it’s time to get your Headshots. Don’t be cheap on these pictures. They are your calling card and the most important 1st investment of your career. When you shoot your headshots, you will need 2 different headshots; 1 commercial picture, which usually has a great big smile and lots of energy, and 1 dramatic picture. I always suggest MichaelHelms.com Stephanie Girard, Linda Vanoff, and Mark Cartright. They are great photographers and competitively priced at $250-$450 for 3-4 looks. During your photo session, make sure you try different emotions so you can get different looks; angry, happy, serious. Be thinking about something when you are shooting. Acting is the eyes and the camera will pick up a blank look. So have real emotion. Plus, doing this will give you more pics to chose from later. Remember your pics should look exactly like you. When you get a manager or agent show them the pictures from this 1st session, they may be able to use them, or they may have you shoot again with a photographer they recommend. This is quite common. You will change your pictures often and every time you change your look. Note: If you are not getting called in on auditions, it may be that your headshot is not working. Try a different picture until you find one that works.

Your photographer may help you choose 2 pics and retouch them digitally for you. Then you should make 25-50 8x10 reproductions. You can do this at Ray's Photo Lab online. Simply upload your high resolution image and follow the site's directions.

REPUTABLE ONLINE CASTING WEBSITES
Your next step is to join several online casting websites including Actors Access, La Casting, backstage.com and Now Casting. These sites contain breakdowns of all kind of jobs that you can submit your picture and resume for. If you are selected you will be called into audition for the role. A breakdown is a description of the project and characters. Sides are the pages of script you will be required to read from.

On all of your Online Casting Websites, upload at least 5 different pictures with different looks and expressions, complete the resume section, and pay for unlimited submissions on each site. You should submit yourself EVERYDAY to non-union feature films, pilots, TV shows, student films, commercials, webisodes and more. When you audition for these projects give it 100% and hope you book it, but don’t dwell on it. This is a numbers game and you may have to audition 100 times to book 1 project. The better your audition skills, the better those odds get. That is why it is so important to take audition classes when you get here. I recommend Doug Warhit,  MelissaSkoff.com She is a Casting Director who has cast 100+ Features & TV Shows and thousands of actors. She is great, you will learn a lot, and I recommend her to all of my signed clients. For Scene Study classes Bobbie Chance offers a great class for only $25. There are tons of great classes, but to see the ones I recommend read one of my other blogs about Los Angeles Acting Classes.

Often when you start auditioning for acting jobs, the ones you book will be non-paying, but that is okay. You are a beginner. Each time you work you will gain experience and a credit for your resume. You may also get the footage of your work to use on your Demo Reel. It usually takes awhile to get any of the footage so be patient, yet at the same time be persistent and polite while you try to get it. Expect to train and work on projects that you self submit for for the first 2 years.

Once you have strong audition skills, some acting experience and credits on your resume, along with numerous training credits your next step is to start building relationships with Managers, Agents and Casting Directors. (Don't do this until you are ready)

Casting Directors are THE people that bring you to the people can hire you. They are incredibly important people that need to know you and what you can do. I think the best way to meet them is by attending various Casting Director Workshops. They are usually 1-2 hours and Casting Directors take time to read you, watch you and even give you feedback. Places like Act Now! Actors West, Actors LinkReal Pros and One on One offer regular Casting Director Workshops.

Don’t bother mass mailing your photos and headshots to Casting Directors. They don’t respond and you waste your time and money. In the beginning of your career a Casting Director may call you in to audition because you have the look they may be looking for. Usually you will most likely to be considered for smaller roles because you have less experience. These roles are called 5 and Under meaning you may have only 5 lines or under. These are great for your resume and give you valuable experience. Most agents won’t even consider you until you have had some of these. So start trying to get small roles in lesser know TV known shows, roles in indie films, and work as much as you can so you can develop your talent, gain experience and become more interesting to Agent and managers.

If you are coming here with big dreams and you feel that you are very talented, you are going to have to prove that to everyone. No one know will know what you are capable of, even you haven’t seen all you can do. Booking these beginning jobs will help you become more confident and more aware of your own abilities. Don't think you are going to move out to LA and get on a TV show right away. That almost NEVER happens. Doing that is like catching lightning in a bottle and is about the same odds as winning the lottery. Instead, be prepared to make contacts, work hard, study continuously and work every chance you can get.

Once you are able to prove yourself to Agents with a great resume and a Demo Reel that shows your ability, you will absolutely need an Agent to take you to the next level. Agents will submit you on the big stuff and if you do everything I have mentioned for the first 2 or 3 years when you are here, you may just be ready to grab the attention of an Agent. There is a lot of competition for an agent so you have to be prepared, have strong skills, and be persistent. There are more actors than available agents. Do live theatre, get in a show and invite agents to see you. A great way to have agents become familiar with your work is to participate in Showcases in front of agents. To participate in a showcase check out HollywoodActingworkshop.com or ActorsWest.com

Miscellaneous items you need are a passport and a Thomas Guide. The Thomas Guide contains maps of LA and surrounding areas. If your phone or car has GPS this will also help you. If you are looking for a safe, convenient place to live, I suggest Studio City or North Hollywood. They have easy access to major freeways, it's filled with industry people and other actors. Academy Pointe Apartments at 6340 Lankershim Boulevard, North Hollywood is a great place to start.

You must always be going for this career 100% - be over prepared for auditions, familiarize yourself with the sides and script when available, know the TV shows you are auditioning for and the tone of them. Definitely carry a box of headshots and resumes- stapled- in your trunk and bring them to every audition. Have several outfits in your care, sporty, business, etc. Do not show up unprepared. It will make you look bad and your manager or agent look bad. People want to work with professionals, so be professional. Be early to every meeting or audition, be polite and have an attitude of Gratitude. No one owes you anything. There is always another actor available who is better than you, so work hard to become your best and be respectful. Leave the negative part of your ego wherever it is you are moving from.

You will need to create a website with your Headshots, Resumes and Contact Info to make it easy for industry people to find out about you. You can build one through Go Daddy. There are also many other companies out there. Your website address should just be your name. Nothing fancy like "Joe the greatest actor in the world." Here is an example of a professional working Actor's website www.MorganObenreder.com

You will need to change your phone number when you come out here to a local number either 818, 310, 323 so Casting Directors, Managers etc.will know you are here to stay.

You will need to have, or begin creating a DEMO Reel. If you don't have one you can use the footage of the projects you book to start to build your resume and your Reel. You can also hire a production company to shoot a scene or monologue for you. It will look professional and help you get auditions. I recommend Group 8 Productions (818) 808-0022. Having a Demo Reel is crucial and will make it so much easier to sell yourself to Casting Directors and Agents. Once your Reel is complete you will need to upload it to all of your Online Casting Websites. Once you have your Demo Reel, create a YOU TUBE Channel and upload your Demo Reel to it. You can send the link to interested Casting Directors and Managers. Note: A Demo Reel should never be longer than 2-3 minutes. If you have multiple scenes upload each one individually.

Get some Business Cards with your photo on them, website address, the links to your La Casting and Actors Access profiles and a local phone number. Always be prepared to make new contacts and keep track of them in a computer database program like ACT or a simple notebook. You will want to follow up with everyone you meet regularly and professionally. "Reasonable Contact" is appropriate and is exemplified by sending a Post Card thanking Casting Directors for an audition, announcing an acting job you booked, a callback you got, a show you are appearing in, or "Happy Holidays" Card at Christmas. Keep in touch with people every month. You can order business cards online for only $25 at VistaPrint.com

Constant marketing, Headshots, Reels and Auditioning Skills are the basis for how you begin your Acting Career. The Acting business is a process. Working in this industry takes time, a plan and luck. 50,000 new actors come to LA every year and within 3 years 90% leave. So if you want to be part of the 10% that stays and actually works, you have got to see this as a business that you run and are always building. Rarely are there overnight successes. Your team, which includes YOU, your Manager and Agent, will work for you and help you grow your business. 25% of your career will be acting 75% of it will be promoting yourself and doing business. I hope this gives you something to think about.

Don't come out here broke if you can help it. Save as much money as you can between now and when you come out. $10,000 is what it takes every year to pay for this acting career. Be ready to work hard when you get here. Only hard workers succeed in this business.

Make friends with the other actors you meet in acting classes. They are a great support, may have been here longer than you, and often have a wealth of information and experience. But choose the positive people. Every actor has a different experience here and you don't need anyone else's negativity. Surround yourself with other hard working actors who are focused and working. You can learn a lot from them.

If you are going to some out to LA to "make it" and work as an actor I give you this solid piece of advice: Don't come if you can be happy doing anything else. This is a very difficult business, full of rejection, competition and disappointment. You ONLY want to come here if Acting is the ONLY way you can be happy. And then, your goal should not be to come here so you can "become famous" instead, it should be to become the best actor you can be and do work you are in love with.

I offer a workshop called, “The Winner's Circle" for brand new actors which will help you begin to understand the business and start to develop a plan of action for your success. I teach it along with several important industry friends of mine a theatrical Agent, Commercial Agent, Casting Director, Headshot Photographer, Working Actor and Reel Producer. You will learn so much information in this workshop from top people in the business  who are all committed to your success! I have been coaching actors for years so if you are new to this business I highly recommend this workshop. It will give you the "inside" information you need and it will put you miles ahead of the hundreds of other newcomers that arrive in L.A. every year. At the end of this 4-hour seminar with us you will have a game plan for success. The cost is $179 and it's worth every penny. Visit my website and sign up today for the next workshop. (818) 203-6080

People ask what kind of actors do I look for?

They have to be talented and have a huge drive to succeed in this industry. They have to be focused and willing to give everything they have to the process; the preparation, the auditions, the classes, the characters they play, and the jobs they get. They have to be ready for 95 no's to every 1 yes. They need to be well-trained and always training. They have to have time and resources to aggressively pursue their career. And they have to be open to taking my direction.

I have to feel that any actor I work with would be a responsible person for me to invest my time, energy, expertise and resources in. I only get paid when they do. Therefore, I want people who are going to work hard at what they do, as hard as I work to get them the opportunities. When I take on a developmental client, which means they have no TV credits, have only done student films, don't know casting directors, don't have an agent, I know it will likely take years to build them into a profitable business. If I take that risk with someone, it is because I believe in them, their talent and their ability to really succeed in this business. I truly enjoy the creative process of developing an actor's career. I am as happy as they are when they get a job. Not because of the money (although that can be great) rather because of the actors chance to be creative and express themselves as artists. I live for giving these amazing people that I work with that opportunity.


Make sure to regularly check out my other blogs at “How to Break Into Show Business: Secrets of a Talent Manager” where I discuss in more detail each of the subjects I have covered above. 


IF YOU WANT TO BE ON TV AND IN FILMS 
YOU MUST GET THESE e-BOOKS HERE.  
Buy 1 get the other e-Book FREE! (For a limited time)

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5MBYUZJRTCS6A      https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ZZQDDEENHD97U


A few times a year I offer a workshop called, “The Winner's Circle" for brand new actors which will help you begin to understand the business and start to develop a plan of action for your success. I teach it along with several important industry friends of mine including a top Theatrical Agent, Commercial Agent, Casting Director, Headshot Photographer, Working Actor and including Reel Producer. You will learn so much information in this workshop from top people in the business who are all committed to your success! I have been coaching actors for years, and I know new actors need a mentor and professional guidance, so if you are new to this business I highly recommend this workshop. It will give you the "inside" information you need and it will put you miles ahead of the hundreds of other newcomers that arrive in L.A. every year. At the end of this 4-hour seminar with us you will have a game plan for success. The cost is $179 and it's worth every penny. Visit my website and sign up today for the next workshop. Check website for next date and for more info.



I wish you great success! Break a Leg!

If you liked this information and found it helpful leave a comment! I love to hear from new people.

Subscribe to my Secrets Of A Hollywood Talent Manager TV You Tube Channel with over 200 FREE Videos! And follow me on Twitter @WAW_wendy


Wendy Alane Wright Smith
The Hollywood Talent Manager
WAW ENTERTAINMENT
wawentertainment@yahoo.com